The Summer 2017 issue has just been published

We hope that you enjoyed the brief Yorkshire summer weather last week.  Unfortunately the rains have returned and the temperatures have plummeted – and the smug weather forecasters say it will stay that way for quite a while.  Every cloud has a silver lining though, so make yourself a pot of Yorkshire tea and download and enjoy the Summer 2017 issue.

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In this issue we feature five interesting and captivating articles that look back in time.
!The Yorkshire Journal Summer 2017_Page_08_Image_0001
For our first feature Claire Mason visits the birthplace of the famous Brontë children at Thornton in Bradford. In Claire’s article she explains how Patrick Brontë first met his wife Maria Branwell and moved to the parsonage at Thornton where Charlotte, Branwell, Emily and Anne were born. The original font in which the Brontë children were baptized can be seen in a new St James Church at Thornton. Following the Brontës’ departure to Haworth the ‘old parsonage’ has undergone several changes. An additional shop frontage was built in 1898 and in the late 1990s it opened as a museum. Today the old parsonage is a café and visitors can see the fireplace in the drawing room in front of which the four children were born.

In our next feature Diana Parsons gives an account of the lives of William and Alice Ellis, two dedicated Quakers. Both were Quaker ministers and married in 1688. As a travelling minster William roamed widely, not only in Yorkshire but also nationally and internationally. Following his return to Airton he resumed attendance at the Settle Monthly Meetings where his wife Alice continued her ministerial duties. William died at Airton in 1709 and eleven years later in 1720 Alice also died. Both were interred in the burial ground attached to the Meeting House next door to their cottage. Before their deaths both conveyed their home and its land to the Friends to provide accommodation for apprentices and travelling ministers. Their Meeting House in Airton is still used for its original purpose.

Then Stephen Riley continues his fascinating story of Yorkshire’s railway seaside holiday posters. In this issue he explores Filey’s Railway Seaside Holiday Posters and the development of the seaside town. He includes Butlin’s Holiday Camp, Filey which closed in 1983 and a visit to the Filey Museum.

 

Hornsea Museum Volunteers have submitted a detailed article on Hornsea Museum, which is located on Newbegin, the main street in Hornsea. It is housed in a farmhouse and associated buildings dating from the 16th to the 21st century. It is essentially a folk museum with Victorian period rooms and displays village crafts, local history, farming and Hornsea Pottery.

For our last feature Daniel Theyer remembers Pennine Magazine and gives a full report of its rise and fall. Just another casualty in the publication of Yorkshire magazines.

But there is much more to these articles, please read and enjoy them. We welcome your comments, and even more we welcome new authors – so please share your interests with us.

To download this issue please click Summer 2017

 

Spring 2017 issue published

We hope that you all enjoyed a first taste of Spring during the superb sunny and warm weekend.  The weaqther didn’t last of course – but then we knew that would happen didn’t we.  No matter, download a spring sized helping of sunny articles in our latest issue.

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The Parish Church of St Oswald, Leathley

The Spring edition features six more interesting and captivating articles.
The first feature is the Withernsea Lighthouse Museum in East Yorkshire by Tony Simpson. The most unusual feature of this lighthouse is that it is approximately a quarter of a mile inland from the sea. At the end of June 1976 the lighthouse was decommissioned and today is a museum of memorabilia concerning the RNLI, Coastguards and local history. Part of the museum is also dedicated to actress Kay Kendall who was born on the same street as the Withernsea lighthouse.

Then Margaret Mills looks into another aspect of the life of the Brontës and gives an account of the life of Martha Brown who was a servant and friend of the Brontë family. Martha Brown was born in Haworth in 1828 and was the eldest of the 6 daughters of John and Mary Brown of Haworth. John was a stonemason by trade, who also fulfilled the role of church sexton. Although from very humble roots, Martha was a vital link in the Brontë story, so much so that the famous novelist Elizabeth Gaskell sought her help when writing her best-selling biography The Life of Charlotte Brontë.

Stephen Riley continues his fascinating story of Yorkshire’s railway seaside holiday posters. Bridlington is the next seaside resort on the east coast after Hornsea and Withernsea and once the railways arrived in 1846 it soon became a popular resort. Stephen explains how Bridlington developed into a holiday resort with the success and sad demise of the numerous posters that appeared on railway billboards from the end of Victoria’s reign right up to modern times.

For our next story Julian Giles visits Holy Trinity Church, Wensley in North Yorkshire which is noted for its magnificent art work in wood carvings and brass memorial plaques. The church also displays two interesting fragments of medieval wall paintings on the north wall of the nave. They depicted two separate scenes ‘The Three Living and The Three Dead’ and ‘A legend in the Life of Saint Eloi’. Julian who has researched these medieval wall paintings reports on them in full detail including a history of the church.

Also in Holy Trinity Church, Wensley are several Anglo-Saxon stone carvings, of which two have inscriptions. Jeremy Clark has studied these carved stones and an Anglo-Saxon burial of a man with a sword found in the Wensley churchyard and gives a comprehensive description of them.

For our last feature Margaret Mills reviews the BBC drama production To Walk Invisible which expresses the story of the Brontë sisters’ rise to literary fame and publication against all odds. Brian Wade visits the film locations at Haworth, Shibden Hall, Halifax and Micklegate in York. A full-sized replica of the Brontë Parsonage and its surrounding was built on Penistone Hill above Haworth in order for it to look the same way it did when the Brontës lived there. This purpose built production set has since been dismantled.

But there is much more to these articles, please read and enjoy them. We welcome your comments.

To download please click  Spring 2017

The Winter 2016 issue has been published

xmas16If you need a break from all the Chrismas preparations the good news is that the winter 2016 issue of the Yorkshire journal has just been published, so put you feet up and enjoy it.

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Click on the cover picture above for details of contents or click here to download the publication

If you enjoy the magazine tell your friends about it – if there is something you would like to see in a future issue tell us about it, or, even better, draft an article for us.

All the very best for 2017

Read the new Autumn issue

Now that the long dark evenings are returning and we spend more time indoors the good news is that the autumn 2016 issue of the Yorkshire journal has just been published

Cover Autumn 2016

Click on the cover picture above for details of contents or click here to download the publication

If you enjoy the magazine tell your friends about it – if there is something you would like to see in a future issue tell us about it.

Happy reading

Good news on a wet June evening

The summer 2016 issue of the Yorkshire journal has just been published

Cover Summer 2016

Click on the cover picture above for details of contents or click here to download the publication

If you enjoy the magazine tell your friends about it – if there is something you would like to see in a future issue tell us about it.

Happy reading

 

The Spring 2016 issue is now available to download

The staff of The Yorkshire Journal would like to wish all our readers a very happyEaster.  We are delighted to announce publication of the Spring 2016 issue which includes the usual wide selection of interesting articles for our readers, brief details below. 

spring2016_CoverSome friends and acquaintances of the Brontë family’ by Margaret Mills.
spring2016_Page_09_Image_0001Most people will be familiar with at least some of the background story of the Brontë family. In Margaret’s article she gives an account of some friends and acquaintances who, at different times and in varying situations, touched the lives of the literary Bronte family, and were influential in their story.
In Xanadu… A Subterranean Pleasure Dome in Scarborough
Over the years Scarborough has sadly lost many of its attractions so spring2016_Page_15_Image_0001 well-known to generations of summer visitors.  Probably the saddest loss to Scarborough was its subterranean entertainment hall, known latterly as Gala Land. In Peter Wellburn’s article he outlines the history of Scarborough as a seaside resort and, in particular, recalls the fascinating history of Gala Land and some of its mystical atmosphere. By the late 1950s it was in decline and in 1967 it was demolished to make way for an underground car park.

The Yorkshire bat: information, rescue, care and release
spring2016_Page_22_Image_0001Geoff and Mary Wilson inform us about the significance of bats in Yorkshire and dispel some of the myths that have created negativity around these fascinating mammals. Their detailed article describes the different species living within the county and the environment in which each of these is usually found. In their article they look at the life cycle of a bat throughout the year and explain what to do if you find a bat.
A Mysterious Medieval Effigy and Grave Slabs at All Saints Church, Batley, West Yorkshire

A Mysterious Medieval Effigy and Grave Slabs at All Saints Church, Batley, West Yorkshirespring2016_Page_37_Image_0001
For our last story Jeremy Clark visits All Saints Church, Batley in West Yorkshire to unravel a story of a mysterious medieval effigy and grave slabs built into the external walls of the church. In his fascinating article he explains that the Batley effigy is very special because the broad flat ‘sword’ that he is wearing is probably a ‘weaving sword’ rather than a weapon. This indicates that the Batley effigy belonged to a successful man in the mediaeval textile business and probably dates to the late 14th century.

But there is much more to these articles, please read and enjoy them – and then tell your friends about them. We welcome your comments and contributions.

To download please click  The Yorkshire Journal Spring 2016

If you are a fan of Scarborough (and who isn’t?) then you will be interested in a new website dedicated to memories of the famous old seaside town – Stories from Scarborough

The Winter 2015 issue is now available to download

The staff of The Yorkshire Journal would like to wish all our readers a very happy Christmas.  We are delighted to announce publication of the Winter 2015 issue which includes the usual wide selection of interesting articles for our readers, and look forward to providing next year’s issues.
The 14th century Hospitium covered in snow in the Museum Gardens, York. Photo by Chris GallagherChristmas in Filey By Paul Williams 4-5
The Yorkshire Journal Winter 2015_Page_05_Image_0002For our first feature Paul Williams shares some of his precious boyhood memories during the seventies of his Christmas in Filey. Paul lived in Teesside but celebrated the festive season each year at his aunt and uncle’s bed and breakfast in Filey where he had enjoyable and happy times.The Charles Dickens Connection with Malton and Ebenezer Scrooge’s Counting House by Philip Hartley 6-9The Yorkshire Journal Winter 2015_Page_08_Image_0005
It is because of Charles Dickens that ghost stories are associated with this time of year. Philip Hartley visits the Counting House Museum in Malton to discover Charles Dickens connection with the town. It is believed that Scrooge’s counting house in ‘A Christmas Carol’ was modelled on a local office owned by solicitor Charles Smithson, who was a great friend Charles Dickens.The Leeds Library by Peter Wellburn 10-13
Leeds libraryOur next feature is Peter Wellburn’s fascinating story of The Leeds Library which is a private subscription library hidden away in the midst of Leeds bustling shopping centre. The library is steeped in history and includes a ghost. Peter, himself was the Librarian in the 1960s and is able to explain all aspects of its history.

Rangers of the Yorkshire Wolds by Diana Parsons 14-17The Yorkshire Journal Winter 2015_Page_14_Image_0001
Next Diana Parsons recalls the extraordinarily lives of a group of people who were know has the ‘Wold Rangers’ as told by Angela Antrim from her own memories. They roamed the lanes of East Yorkshire and each ranger has an interesting story behind them. When the last one died in 1987, all traces of their existence past away.

The Waggoners Memorial at Sledmere, East Yorkshire by Christopher Jowett 18-21
The Yorkshire Journal Winter 2015_Page_19_Image_0003Also linked with the ‘Wold Rangers’ is the Waggoners Memorial at Sledmere in East Yorkshire. Christopher Jowett visits this fascinating World War I memorial and explains why Sir Mark was determined to erect a special memorial to honour the waggons. Their job was not to fight but to transport food, ammunition and other supplies to front line units.

The Yorkshire Journal Winter 2015_Page_22_Image_0002A smile and a wave costs nothing by Daniel Theyer 22-27
Then Daniel Theyer pays tribute to Geoffrey Brindley a local Bradford man known as the ‘Jesus Man’. He became something of a local celebrity through walking, smiling and waving, although he remained an enigma. Geoffrey passed away in October 2015 and Bradford is not going to be the same without him.

 

King Richard III HouseKing Richard III House in Scarborough by Jeremy Clark 22-37
For our last story Jeremy Clark visits King Richard III House in Scarborough which is now a restaurant to carry out a full investigation of its history. Jeremy’s comprehensive article includes all aspects of the house as well as the popular belief that King Richard III stayed there during the summer of 1484.

 

To download this issue please click The Yorkshire Journal Winter 2015

The Autumn 2015 issue is now available to download

We are delighted to announce publication of the Autumn 2015 issue which includes the usual wide selection of interesting articles for our readers.

Autumn2015coverWelcome to the Autumn issue of the Yorkshire Journal.

Autumn 2015_Page_08_Image_0003This issue includes the fascinating story of Anne Brontë’s connection with Scarborough by Claire Mason. Anne was introduced to Scarborough by the Robinson family when she was governess to their children. Between 1840 and 1844, Anne spent around five weeks each summer at the coastal town and fell in love with the place. A number of locations in Scarborough were the setting for Agnes Grey’s final scenes and for Linden-Car village in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. In Claire’s article she takes us back in time when Anne visited Scarborough and visits all the places that would have been familiar to her. Sadly in 1848 Anne caught consumption (tuberculosis), she returned to Scarborough for a change of air, but died on Monday 28th May 1849 and was buried in St. Mary’s Church yard.

Autumn 2015_Page_17_Image_0002Next Julia Oldham takes us on a visit to North Landing at Flamborough Head. She describes this beautiful coast line and what it has to offer visitors. Julia also recounts days when cobles were used at North Landing by fishermen to catch crabs and fish. Nowadays these colourful boats have diesel engines and usually half a dozen can be seen moored up on the beach. They are also used by fishermen to take visitors around the North Landing headlands to view the many caves used by smugglers. This is another aspect of North Landing that Julia points out in her article. Some of the favourite goods were tea, brandy, silk and cotton, smuggled by using a coffin at night from their ships, moored not far from the cove.

Autumn 2015_Page_23_Image_0001Diana Parsons recounts the friendship of Phyllis Bentley, a highly successful novelist, with the well-known writers Marie Hartley and Ella Pontefract in her revealing article ‘Dear Miss Bentley’. Their long lasting friendship was not without problems as Diana explains. After the death of Ella, Marie formed a literary partnership with Joan Ingilby. Over the years Joan had the unenviable role of mediator between Marie and Phyllis, who both had feisty temperaments and firm opinions, although their friendship only came to an end with the death of Phyllis in June 1977.

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Our next feature is a poem by Julia Oldham – YORKSHIRE – It is what it is and I love it! Julia is passionate about Yorkshire reading through her delightful poem.

Autumn 2015_Page_37_Image_0003Jean Griffiths then visits Spofforth Castle near Harrogate, which she discovered was not crowded with visitors being a lesser known castle. In fact Spofforth Castle is a fortified manor house. Jean highlights its history and the Percy family who were gave Spofforth by William the Conqueror, then Percy built a manor house for his family. During the English Civil War (1642-1651), Spofforth Castle was vandalised by Parliamentarian troops which finally reduced it to ruins. Jean then takes us on a tour of the ruined castle and points out that the most distinguishing feature of the castle is an octagonal tower, which Turner sketched in 1797.

Autumn 2015_Page_40_Image_0005For our last feature Jeremy Clark takes us on a journey along the Gypsey Race, which is a meandering stream, steeped in legend and tradition. It carves its way through the Yorkshire Wolds, before it reaches the North Sea at Bridlington. Jeremy explains the most important prehistoric sites that are associated with the stream as he follows its course. The Gypsey Race also runs past many other interesting places and sites including the Rudston Roman Villa, deserted medieval villages and last of all, a meteorite, all of which are detailed by Jeremy in his fascinating article.

But there is much more to these articles, please read and enjoy them. We welcome your comments, it is really important to us to know what readers enjoy most – and least. The Yorkshire Journal is completely free, and we intend it to stay that way.  But (there is always a but),  this means that we have no advertising budget to promote the journal, and have to rely on web links from related sites, Google searches and personal recommendation to find new readers.  Consequently only a very small number of people know about us, and it is frustrating that many people would enjoy the journal – if they only knew about it!So we would really appreciate your help to widen our circulation.   The most important thing is to tell your friends and relatives about us, if you only convince one person to download an issue of the journal it would be much appreciated.  If you belong to a local history society ask them to add a link to our website – we will gladly reciprocate the link.  If you use Facebook then please click the “Like us on Facebook” link at the bottom of this page, or write a short post about us on your Facebook timeline.  However you do it please help us to become better known.

Actually there are two buts.  We have one or two authors who regularly write articles for us, and a few who occasionally do so.  We badly need to increase the number of authors.  People like you who are passionate about Yorkshire.  Almost everyone knows something interesting about their locality which would be of interest to others so please do consider making a contribution.  Or perhaps you know someone who you could persuade to write something for us.  More details in our Contributions page.

Do take a look at our website, we are particularly proud of our comprehensive links section , however, new websites are constantly being added, and some, sadly cease to exist, or do so under another name. So, if there is something you wish to addd or modify, or you find a link which no longer exists, please email our webmaster or leave a comment

Most of all – enjoy the new issue, and dip into our archive too!

To download this issue please click The Yorkshire Journal Autumn 2015

The Summer 2015 issue is now available to download

We are delighted to announce publication of the Summer 2015 issue which includes the usual wide selection of interesting articles for our readers.

The Yorkshire Journal Summer 2015 cover

The Summer issue of the Yorkshire Journal contains the following articles.

The Yorkshire Journal Summer 2015_Page_04_Image_0001Stephen Riley and Sarah Harrison explore the village of Dent, before boarding the train and heading south. They cover all the top tourists’ attractions in the village. Then taking the train from Dent Station heading south we discover more remarkable features and about the construction of the Settle-Carlisle railway line before going through the Blea Moor Tunnel to emerge in North Yorkshire.

The Yorkshire Journal Summer 2015_Page_17_Image_0001Next Gary Peacock recounts the uprising of the Luddites that took place in 1812 in his article, ‘The Dumb Steeple, the Croppers’ Tale and Trouble at the Mill in West Yorkshire’. Gary explains that croppers’ livelihoods were put at risk by increasing mechanisation in the mills, which meant their families faced poverty and starvation. After a failed attack on Cartwright Mills, which resulted in fourteen men being hanged at York, new machines were installed in the mills and the croppers’ trade was nothing but a distant memory.

The Yorkshire Journal Summer 2015_Page_28_Image_0001Mary Shaw then visits the model of an imaginary village of Bondville, at Sewerby, near Bridlington. Its layout covers many individual buildings and hundreds of little character figures. There seem to be activities for everyone. A model train runs round the village and boats move across the water. There is so much going on that only a visit to the model village of Bondville will cover everything.

The Yorkshire Journal Summer 2015_Page_33_Image_0001Hilary Spencer takes a special look at the Bempton Cliffs on the East Yorkshire coast that were featured in the BBC’s special Easter Springwatch. Visitors come to watch the seabirds nesting on the narrow cliff-ledges. But Hilary recalls when people visited the cliffs for a very different reason. This was in the 19th century when men clambered down to harvest eggs from ledges along the sheer cliffs. Hundreds of people came to watch the ‘climmers’ as they were known. Fortunately the practice of collecting seabirds’ eggs came to an end in 1954 with the introduction of Bird Protection Act.

The Yorkshire Journal Summer 2015_Page_39_Image_0001English history is full of action and excitement, and in this issue Jeremy Clark recounts the events that led up to the Battle of Boroughbridge. Edward II had a stormy relationship with the Barons, especially with the Earl of Lancaster. Matters came to ahead in 1322 at the river crossing at Boroughbridge. After what seems to have been a very short battle a truce was made for the rebels to retire into the town for the night, but instead they fled. Lancaster was taken prisoner and after a mock-trial was beheaded.

The Yorkshire Journal Summer 2015_Page_44_Image_0002If history of a more peaceful, personal nature is more to your liking, you will find a great deal to enjoy in Peter Wellburn’s ‘Forge Valley – far from the madding crowd’. He recalls his childhood memories and how his great-grandfather had been born in one of 5 cottages in the valley. It was from these cottages that during the summer refreshments were served to the public, including royalty. One was also known as the chocolate shop. Sadly this row of cottages was demolished before World War II.

The Yorkshire Journal Summer 2015_Page_50_Image_0004For our last article David Reynolds compares an old photo of an Edwardian Yorkshire cycling club to a scene in Alan Bennett’s first television play ‘A Day Out’. The cyclists pause for a smoke and running repairs which is similar to a scene in Alan Bennett’s play.

But there is much more to these articles, please read and enjoy them. We welcome your comments, it is really important to us to know what readers enjoy most – and least. The Yorkshire Journal is completely free, and we intend it to stay that way.  But (there is always a but),  this means that we have no advertising budget to promote the journal, and have to rely on web links from related sites, Google searches and personal recommendation to find new readers.  Consequently only a very small number of people know about us, and it is frustrating that many people would enjoy the journal – if they only knew about it!So we would really appreciate your help to widen our circulation.   The most important thing is to tell your friends and relatives about us, if you only convince one person to download an issue of the journal it would be much appreciated.  If you belong to a local history society ask them to add a link to our website – we will gladly reciprocate the link.  If you use Facebook then please click the “Like us on Facebook” link at the bottom of this page, or write a short post about us on your Facebook timeline.  However you do it please help us to become better known.

Actually there are two buts.  We have one or two authors who regularly write articles for us, and a few who occasionally do so.  We badly need to increase the number of authors.  People like you who are passionate about Yorkshire.  Almost everyone knows something interesting about their locality which would be of interest to others so please do consider making a contribution.  Or perhaps you know someone who you could persuade to write something for us.  More details in our Contributions page.

Most of all – enjoy the new issue, and dip into our archive too!

To download this issue please click The Yorkshire Journal Summer 2015

Spring 2015 issue available to download

We are delighted to announce publication of the The Yorkshire Journal Spring 2015 which includes a wide selection interesting articles for our readers.

The Yorkshire Journal Spring 2015 Front cover

This issue contains the following articles.

.Page_05_Image_0004 Marcus Grant reveals another Crop Circle in Yorkshire. This time the mysterious crop circle phenomenon returned to its old stamping ground around Barnsley, South Yorkshire which, seems to be a favourite place to locate crop circles. Marcus also takes a look back at the best of the mysterious crop circles.
Next, Stephen Riley takes a special look at the Dent Railway Station, which is situated in the Yorkshire Dales National Park and is the highest mainline station in England. It is on the historic Settle-Carlisle line and has now been restored to its former glory. He also uncovers the fascinating history of the station. .Page_12_Image_0001
.Page_17_Image_0002 Alison Hartley returns to Hornsea Mere on the East Yorkshire coast to reveal a very fishy story of two young anglers who caught a big fish, this one did not get away. Also why two Abbeys had a trial by combat for the right to fish the Mere.
Ilkley Moor can be a mysterious place at times, Susan’s account ranges from prehistoric times to well-known characters of the moor, plus the major fire of 2006, conservation, grouse shooting and even alien encounters on the moor! .Page_24_Image_0001
 Page_31_Image_0004 In contrast to Rombalds Moor, Thorne Moors is a lowland raised mire, a much rarer habitat. Daniel explains the formation of Thorne Moors after the last ice age, and chronicles their near destruction at the hands of man in recent times.
For our last article Julian Giles explains the story of the Devil’s Stone which is an unusual crudely carved stone inside St Michael and All Angels’ Church at Copgrove, North Yorkshire. Page_41_Image_0001

But there is much more to these articles, please read and enjoy them. We welcome your comments, it is really important to us to know what readers enjoy most – and least. The Yorkshire Journal is completely free, and we intend it to stay that way.  But (there is always a but),  this means that we have no advertising budget to promote the journal, and have to rely on web links from related sites, Google searches and personal recommendation to find new readers.  Consequently only a very small number of people know about us, and it is frustrating that many people would enjoy the journal – if they only knew about it!So we would really appreciate your help to widen our circulation.   The most important thing is to tell your friends and relatives about us, if you only convince one person to download an issue of the journal it would be much appreciated.  If you belong to a local history society ask them to add a link to our website – we will gladly reciprocate the link.  If you use Facebook then please click the “Like us on Facebook” link at the bottom of this page, or write a short post about us on your Facebook timeline.  However you do it please help us to become better known.

Actually there are two buts.  We have one or two authors who regularly write articles for us, and a few who occasionally do so.  We badly need to increase the number of authors.  People like you who are passionate about Yorkshire.  Almost everyone knows something interesting about their locality which would be of interest to others so please do consider making a contribution.  Or perhaps you know someone who you could persuade to write something for us.  More details in our Contributions page.

We have greatly expanded our Links page since publishing the last issue, so there is lots more to look at after you have finished reading this issue

Most of all – enjoy the new issue, and dip into our archive too!